53 Comments
May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

Ferguson's computer model was utterly, completely, and totally way off. What does this say about all the other computer model predictions that are used daily to frighten us into compliance ?

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May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

Spot on. I was with you on this from the start.

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May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

I think that if you always predicted the opposite to Ferguson you'd always be right.

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After reading your subject, of course the first thing that appeared in my head was our new Mistress of Truth launching into song: “We don’t talk about Sweden, no no no…”

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May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

How come people diss BELARUSE, which even outlawed the mentioning of the word "covid"?

I remember there were about 25 jurisdictions which never locked down; there could have been more.

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May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

One of the criticisms I've received from the twitterati when I've raised this point in the past, is that we are not comparing like with like, that every country differs in terms of its population density, urbanisation, customs, etc. How can we control for these factors?

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May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

Thank you, Joel. That Unherd interview with Giesecke should have been pivotal.

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When you tell the model that masks and distancing works, the model tells YOU that masks and distancing work!

Garbage in, garbage out.

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May 1, 2022·edited May 1, 2022Liked by Joel Smalley

Great chart. Would love to see more countries or US states. I see a couple points in time where excess deaths appear to accelerate - i wonder to what could those possibly correlate?

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Has there been a time when Neil was right?

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If you point to Sweden’s lower (than, say, the UK’s) excess mortality rates, the pro lockdown response will always be: ‘well, look at Norway and Denmark’!

Can you point to any sensible material that focuses on Norway & Denmark, their low excess mortality, and the strengths & weaknesses of comparisons of theirs with Sweden’s excess mortality? I’d like to read it.

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The first pandemic book I read in Feb 2021 was The Price of Panic: How the Tyranny of Experts Turned a Pandemic into a Catastrophe - Jay Andrews, Douglas Axe & Wm Briggs. I'm not a scientist, but I'm very skeptical of the WHO changing the definition of "pandemic" a decade ago. Covid impacted me Jan 2022 as a normal 7-10 day cold, but Trudeau's/govt's tyrannical response - isolation, segregated from restaurants and my gym, and forbidden to fly or escape dreaded Cdn winters - has altered my joy of life immensely. It's heart-sickening that voices like yours were silenced, and that so much of humanity has been utterly duped by Covid fraud.

I've never been afraid of Covid, but I'm genuinely frightened I'll never be able to travel/fly again. MP Michael Barrett asked Trudeau why Cda was lagging other countries in dropping vaccine mandates, and Trudeau replied by demanding Barrett express support for abortion rights!?!🤡

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May 1, 2022·edited May 1, 2022

@Joel Smalley, depending on the perspective, "all deaths are equal" is either correct or not. Assuming you meant Covid vs. non-Covid deaths are equal, I agree. However, if one considers the premature death of a young person (whether child or even middle-age adult), that death seems more tragic than the death of someone who has reached his or her community's life expectancy. I believe the metric to capture this point is "years of life lost". If you could run an analysis that compared YLL/100K or YLL/M for various countries, the results might be very illuminating.

Another potentially worthwhile analysis would be to begin "Comparison of Excess Mortality Across Europe and Scandinavia" up to 5 years before Covid appeared. The reason is that in various communities there are better years for mortality and worse years. A few years of mortality that is below expectations likely means that there is plenty of "dry tinder" that is highly susceptible to an epidemic hitting the community. I believe Sweden was in just such a place in the few years leading up to 2020. While one could consider such an analysis as cherry-picking data, the point would be to explain why Sweden seemed to do somewhat worse than its Nordic peers.

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FergusWRONG is now his name.

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Might you not be overstating the case, or overcertain of your conclusion? Not knowing very much about it, but it seems to me your last sentences might be better written as 'No, Neil, you look to have been completely wrong. Wrong in July 2020, and even more certainly wrong now.'?

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I’ll be interested to see how they do in terms of this hepatitis in children.

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